A Culture of Antagonism

It was a day like any other, and it was an innocently looking article like any other. But on this one day, this one particular article and this one paragraph in particular that just missed my good side entirely:

Jim Carrey brought us our first live-action taste of Count Olaf from A Series of Unfortunate Events, but Netflix’s upcoming TV series adaptation is (thankfully) going in a different direction.

It’s an article from The Verge. It’s nothing out of the ordinary, and I like this publication perfectly fine. I hold no grudges against the author either — this could’ve been published in any fine recent publication. All’s good on that front. I’m also not a particular Jim Carrey fan these days, that doesn’t change a thing. It’s just, this one day, that last sentence got to me.

but Netflix’s upcoming TV series adaptation is (thankfully) going in a different direction

On this day — it’d been snowing, by the way, it was rather pretty outside — this one sentence reminded me of everything I loathe about modern online discourse. I read this sentence — and I invite you to correct me, gosh I hope so much that I’m wrong about this — as an off-hand dismissive critique of the older film Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, starring Jim Carrey, Emily Browning and Liam Aiken. The sentence seems to suggest that this older film is so atrociously bad that the new Netflix series (which I welcome) thankfully goes in a different direction. THANKFULLY! THANKFULLY!!

It’s fun how bright the day can look when snow covers the ground. Yet inside of me, my heart held only darkness.

The 2004 movie is one of my favorite movies of all time. I dare you to watch the following deleted scene, and not at least have a tiny appreciation for the music and the visuals. Gorge on those trees.

 

This scene ends on a simple note: There’s always something. And this film has just that: something. I heartily recommend it to you. Watch it tonight, I’m sure you can stream it.

While I mourn the lack of a sequel, I’m not objecting to a Netflix remake, I welcome it. It’s a wonderful story, I’d love more. What I mourn is that we can’t respect creative work for what it is. Today we apparently have to hate something that wasn’t a runaway box office success and the beginning of an endless franchise.

In fact Lemony Snicket did reasonably at the box office and got a solid 72% at RottenTomatoes. It featured amazing performances by two of my favorite actresses, Meryl Streep and Jennifer Coolidge, not to mention the protagonist kids themselves. The soundtrack is amazing, and the end titles… oh the end titles. Take it in:

There are no levels on which I don’t adore this film. It’s okay if you don’t. 

Lately it just feels like everyone hates everything. Because it’s easier to dismiss something, than to like it. Because if you like something, you put yourself out there. You reveal to the world what makes you happy, what makes you cry, what makes you reflect, cope with, or just enjoy life. Someone might make fun of you for loving something, so it’s easier to hate it. It’s breeds a culture of antagonism, and while it might protect you from occasional ridicule by people not worth your time, it also insulates you from possibly discovering something amazing.

If only we could see past arbitrary notions of what’s cool to like, and judge movies and music and books on their own merits. Because there’s always something.