Archive, Don't Delete

I’m one of the lucky … actually I have no idea how many or few have Google Inbox. In any case, I was graciously sent an invite, and have been using it on the web and on my Android phone since then. I love almost everything about it. I particularly love the fact that Inbox seems to be able to divine what archetype an email has. Is it spam? Don’t show it to me. Is it travel-related? Bundle it up. Same with purchases, social network notifications, promos, etc. It even does a good job of prioritizing each bundle, and only showing notifications when it thinks it’s urgent — configurable of course. It’s pretty great.

I don’t love how hard it is to delete an item. You have to dive down deeply into an overflow menu on a particular email to find the “Trash” button. I wish it was more easily accessible — I don’t know man, I guess I’m a deleter. I remember buying a 320mb harddrive called “Bigfoot” because it was so humongous, but even then I had to manage my space in order to fit everything. So I can’t help but feel like this is a generational issue, and I’m now a relic of the past. It had to happen eventually, and I’m getting a really strong vibe that the ceremonial burial of the trash button was very much intentional. It’s behaviorism: teaching you not to delete, because archiving is faster and safer.

The crux of the Inbox app is the embracing of the idea that an email is a task. This is contrary to a very popular notion that you should very much separate those two paradigms as much as you can, so it’s very interesting to see Google leaning into it. Combined with their concept of “bundles”, I think it makes it work.

Let’s walk through it: it’s Monday morning and you just arrived at the office to open up your email. You received a couple of promos from Spotify and Amazon in one bundle, an unbundled email from mom, 9 bundled Facebook notifications, and two shipping notifications in a bundle. The one email worth looking at is immediately obvious, so you can either tap “Done” on the “Promos”, “Purchases” and “Social” bundles to end up with only the one email, or you can pin moms email and tap the “Sweep” button. Everything but the email that needs your attention is archived and marked “Done”, and it took seconds.

This is how Inbox is supposed to work. You archive tasks you’re done with, you don’t delete. If something important did happen to be in one of the tasks you quickly marked done, it’s still there, accessible via a quick search. If you get a lot of email, I really do believe that embracing Inbox will take away stress from your daily life. All it asks is that you let go of your desire to manage your archive. You have to accept that there are hundreds of useless Facebook notification emails in your archive, emails you’d previously delete. It’s okay, they’re out of sight, out of mind, and no you won’t run out of space because of them. Checking 9 boxes and then picking the delete button, as opposed to simply clicking one “Done” button — the time you spend adds up, and you need to let go.

I know this. I understand this. As a webdesigner myself, I think there are profound reasons for hiding the delete button. It’s about letting machines do the work for you, so you can do more important things instead, like spending time with your family. It’s the right thing to do. And I’m not quite ready for it yet. Can I have the trash button be a primary action again, please, Google?

One thought on “Archive, Don't Delete”

  1. Jamie says:

    Came across your blog while searching for an extension or plugin to add the trash button to the main screen. Obviously I agree with you 🙂

    I certainly appreciate Google’s desire to archive the world, but they are ignoring the major functional problem created for end users by expecting us to not delete stuff: searching.

    I archive things because I want to be able to find them again. I trash 90% of my mail (mailing lists, promos, shipping notifications, whatever) because when I’ve trashed it, it has no more value, and I never want to see it again. But leaving your useful stuff in a pile of trash makes it much, much harder to find your useful stuff in the future.

    I have to wonder if they actually use their own product…

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