The One Platform Is Dead

I used to strongly believe the future of apps would be rooted in web-technologies such as HTML5. Born cross-platform, they’d be really easy to build, and bold new possiblities were just around the corner. I still believe webapps will be part of the future, but recently I’ve started to think it’s going to be a bit more muddled than that. If you’ll indulge me the explanation will be somewhat roundabout.

The mobile era in computing, more than anything, helped propel interface design patterns ahead much faster than decades of desktop operating systems did. We used to discuss whether your app should use native interface widgets or if it was okay to style them. While keeping them unstyled is often still a good idea, dwelling on it would be navelgazing, as it’s no longer the day and night indicator whether an app is good or not. In fact we’re starting to see per-app design languages that cross not only platforms, but codebases too. Most interestingly, these apps don’t suck! You see it with Google rolling out Material Design across Android and web-apps. Microsoft under Satya Nadella is rolling out their flatter-than-flat visual language across not only their own Windows platforms, but iOS and Android as well. Apple just redesigned OSX to look like iOS.

It feels like we’re at a point where traditional usability guidelines should be digested and analyzed for their intent, rather than taken at dogmatic face value. If it looks like a button, acts like a button, or both, it’s probably a button. What we’re left with is a far simpler arbiter for success: there are good designs and there are bad designs. It’s as liberatingly simple as not wearing pants.

dogma (noun)
a principle or set of principles laid down by an authority as incontrovertibly true

The dogma of interface design has been left by the wayside. Hired to take its place is a sense of good taste. Build what works for you and keep testing, iterating and responding to feedback. Remembering good design patterns will help you take shortcuts, but once in a while we have to invent something. It either works or it doesn’t, and then you can fix it.

It’s a bold new frontier, and we already have multiple tools to build amazing things. No one single technology or platform will ever “win”, because there is no winning the platform game. The operating system is increasingly taking a back seat to the success of ecosystems that live in the cloud. Platform install numbers will soon become a mostly useless metric for divining who’s #winning this made-up war of black vs. white. The ecosystem is the new platform, and because of it it’s easier than ever to switch from Android to iOS.

It’s a good time to build apps. Come up with a great idea, then pick an ecosystem. You’ll be better equipped to decide what type of code you’ll want to write: does your app only need one platform, multiple, or should it be crossplatform? It’s only going to become easier: in a war of ecosystems, the one that’s the most open and spans the most platforms will be the most successful. It’ll be in the interest of platform vendors to run as many apps as possible, whether through multiple runtimes or just simplified porting. It won’t matter if you wrote your app in HTML5, Java, or C#: on a good platform it’ll just work. Walled gardens will stick around, of course, but it’ll be a strategy that fewer and fewer companies can support.

No, dear reader, I have not forgotten about Jobs’ Thoughts on Flash. Jobs was right: apps built on Flash were bad. That’s why today is such an exciting time. People don’t care about the code behind the curtain.

If it’s good, it’s good.