Mobile

The future of computing is mobile, they say, and they’re not referring to that lovely city in Alabama. Being a fan of smartphones and their UI design, I’ve considered myself mostly in the loop with where things were going, but recently it’s dawned on me I might as well have been lodged in a cave for a couple of years, only to just emerge and see the light. The future of computing is more mobile than I thought, and it’s not actually the future. (It’s now — I hate cliffhangers).

I had a baby a few years ago. That does things to you. As my friend put it, parenthood is not inaccurately emulated by sitting down and getting up again immediately. It’s a mostly constant state of activity. Either you’re busy playing with the child, caring for it, planning for how you’re going to care for the child next, or you’re worrying. There’s very little downtime, and so that becomes a valuable commodity in itself.

One thing parents do — or at least this parent — is use the smartphone. I put things in my calendar and to-do list because if it’s not in my calendar or to-do list I won’t remember it. I don’t email very much, because we don’t do that, but I keep Slack in my pocket. I take notes constantly. I listen to podcasts and music on the device, I control what’s on my television with it, and now I’m also doing my grocery shopping online. (I’d argue that last part isn’t laziness if you have your priorities straight, and having kids comes with an overwhelming sense that you do — it’s powerful chemistry, man.)

So what do I need my laptop for? Well I’m an interface designer, so I need a laptop for work. But when I’m not working I barely use it at all. To put it differently, when I’m not working, I don’t need a laptop at all, and if I were in a different business I’d probably never pick one up. There’s almost nothing important I can’t do on my phone instead, and often times the mobile experience is better, faster, simpler. By virtue of there being less realestate, there’s just not room for clutter. It requires the use of design patterns and a focus on usability like never before. Like when a sculptor chips away every little piece that doesn’t resemble, a good mobile experience has to simplify until only what’s important remains.

It’s only in the past couple of years that the scope of this shift has become clear to me, and it’s not just about making sure your website works well on a small screen. Computers have always been doing what they were told, but the interaction has been shackled by lack of portability and obtuse interfacing methods. Not only can mobile devices physically unshackle us from desks, but their limitations in size and input has required the industry to think of new ways to divine intent and translate your thoughts into bits. Speaking, waving at, swiping, tapping, throwing and winking all save us from repetitive injuries, all the while being available to us on our own terms.

I’m in. The desktop will be an afterthought for me from now on — and the result will probably be better for it. I joked on Twitter the other day about watch-first design. I’ve now slept on it, and I’m rescinding the joke part. My approach from now on is tiny-screen first and then graceful scaling. Mobile patterns have already standardized a plethora of useful and recognizable layouts, icons and interactions that can benefit us outside of only the small screens. The dogma of the desktop interface is now a thing of the past, and mobile is heralding a future of drastically simpler and better UI. The net result is not only more instagrams browsed, it’s more knowledge shared and learned. The fact that I can use my voice to tell my television to play more Knight Rider is just a really, really awesome side-effect.