Newspeak

When you reach a certain age, that is, the age when you start sentences with “When you reach a certain age”, you start to think that kids today aren’t what they used to be. Which is of course an eternal falsetruth because kids both are, and are not what they used to be. And kids today say “fail”.

Actually, kids say many dumb things, including “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”, but the word “fail” when used as a noun, makes me die a little inside. Like the sound frequency that breaks glass, the mere utterance of the word initiates an intellectual necrosis in my being. It makes me sad, tired, and a little on-edge. Instantly.

It’s not so much the meaning, I’m fine with failing. In fact, I do it all the time. Sometimes I even learn from my failures. That’s when experience is generated. Yay for that.

It’s when the word is used in its impoverished, truncated non-verb form. Fail. It makes me think of George Orwell and Idiocracy. It confirms my fears of the future and amplifies them. We’re dumbing down the language to a point where expression is becoming a scarce resource; and this at a time where the tools for publishing said are increasingly numerous and easy to use. Yet time and again expressions are truncated, not even filling the 140 character limit. Poof. Gone with the wind in a cacophany of who cares.

Go start a blog or something, write about your cat or the difficulty of the human condition. If you must use the word “fail”, use it in a sentence. On the other hand, if enough people use the noun-form word in a meaningful way — excrutiating as it would be — one day “fail” would be canonized a noun in the dictionary. What would really sanction the word would be if Stephen Hawking used it to describe string theory. That would be the day I embraced newspeak.

5 thoughts on “Newspeak”

    1. Joen says:

      Oh that is beautiful!

  1. Chris says:

    My problem with “fail” isn’t so much the succinctness of the statement rather, the impetus behind it. “Fail” often implies a lack of thought on the part of the commenter. There are no words to give the “fail” context because the originator hasn’t put nearly enough time into his opinion to have context to add.

    It is not only a failure of grammar and eloquence but a failure of critical thinking, a lack of critical thinking.

    This enrages me. Again, I should not read comments on the internet.

    1. Lasse Brandt says:

      This.

      ( bwahhaahah .. )

      1. Joen says:

        Hah!

        And yes, you should not read comment on the internet. Including these!

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