5 thoughts on “Should you build an iPhone app?”

  1. Jeff Croft says:

    Not quite. The last question on the right should be the first one. If you are going to charge for you app, and you actually care about making money off it, you need to build a native app. That should be the very first question.

    1. Joen says:

      Not quite. The last question on the right should be the first one. If you are going to charge for you app, and you actually care about making money off it, you need to build a native app. That should be the very first question.

      I guess that makes sense. I went over it a lot, and ended up placing it there, because it’s sort of the top of the pyramid. I also wanted it to come after “Will your app do anything that couldn’t be done in HTML5”, because even if you answered no to that one, you might still want to build an iPhone app because you wanted to charge for it.

      Also, feel free to substitute iPhone with Android.

  2. Jeff Croft says:

    Err, sorry…last question on the left.

  3. Chris says:

    Joen, sorry, this is the dumbest thing you’ve ever posted.

    Using the iPhone as your attack vector just makes this look like YAAAP (leave it as an exercise for the reader to work that out). In so doing, and because not everyone knows you like I do, folks will dimiss your entire argument. I know this has more to do with your hopes and dreams of the web and far less to do with any sentiment about Apple, the iPhone, iOS or Android for that matter.

    In the end, it’s down to the developer. I’m not one. I’ll leave this as a consumer message to any developer that may come along seeking sage wisdom.

    I don’t care if you program for HTML5 or in Java, Obj-C, Ruby, BASIC, COBOL or FORTRAN for that matter. All that matters to me is if your app works, is always ready for me to use (online, doesn’t crash) and is a good value for the money.

    If your application meets those criteria then, simply, you should make that app.

    I don’t care what platform you’re developing for. It honest to fucking $deity does not matter to the consumer. The iOS platform is where it is because of the apps. If you want people to use your app, on the platform you’ve chosen to develop for then make the best possible app that can be made. The rest will work itself out.

    Don’t worry about market share. It’s a number invented to support the business of punditry. As of 2009 there were 6.9 billion people. If you reached only 1% and charged them only one dollar, ever, you’d make 67 million dollars.

    Just make your app.

    1. Joen says:

      Joen, sorry, this is the dumbest thing you’ve ever posted.

      Not a bad way to peak. I guess it’s all gonna improve from here?

      I know this has more to do with your hopes and dreams of the web and far less to do with any sentiment about Apple, the iPhone, iOS or Android for that matter.

      While that is an apt conclusion, it’s not entirely true.

      First of all, you feel free to substitute iPhone for Android.

      Secondly, the genesis of this diagram was frustration that an advertising company had hired an acquaintance of mine to write an iPhone app for something that would, for all intents and purposes, work WAY better as a web-app, not having to worry about app store approval, updates and the fact that it would be not only harder to build but one platform instead of multi platform. I won’t reveal any names or true purposes, but suffice to say the app was basically a mobile website converted to an app.

      The whole situation stank of bureaucracy led by a few higher-ups that just got iPhones and still had that whole “ooh shiny!” feeling.

      In the end, it’s down to the developer. I’m not one. I’ll leave this as a consumer message to any developer that may come along seeking sage wisdom.

      Yes! It should be down to the developer. Not the marketing guy that has no idea what he’s talking about.

      I don’t care what platform you’re developing for. It honest to fucking $deity does not matter to the consumer. The iOS platform is where it is because of the apps. If you want people to use your app, on the platform you’ve chosen to develop for then make the best possible app that can be made. The rest will work itself out.

      This is true for all smart apps, but you’re forgetting the dumb ones. Think “Harry Potter pictures” or “K-mart mobile”.

      If your use-case is to find out when K-mart opens or what their phone number is, the best way to find out is open mobile safari, Google K-mart, and be presented with a nice mobile experience. No-one would naturally (or should have to) open the app store, search for K-mart, download an app, then launch it, to find that out.

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