The Windows iTunes Install Process, Archived For Posterity

This is a series of screenshots chronicling the install of iTunes on Windows. Behold:

iTunes_Setup_01 iTunes_Setup_02 iTunes_Setup_03 iTunes_Setup_04 iTunes_Setup_05 iTunes_Setup_06 iTunes_Setup_07

At this point, I’d like to remind viewers that in step 4, I unchecked the “Use iTunes as the default player for audio files” and “Automatically update iTunes and other Apple software” options, so you’d think you wouldn’t get all sorts of services and update apps installed. Not so:

iTunes_Apps iTunes_Services

4 thoughts on “The Windows iTunes Install Process, Archived For Posterity”

  1. Chris says:

    Joen, I love ya, but get a grip.

    You act as though these things have somehow stricken you with a palsy. The Bonjour service is there for a reason and has nothing to do with the options you clicked, it’s for finding shared libraries and connecting to other devices (f’rinstance an Apple TV). AppleMobileDeviceService should be self-explanatory, that’s for catching iOS devices. iPodService is, one can assume, similar. iTunesHelper is, I believe, for catching things like iTunes Store links.

    Perhaps if your operating system of preference were a tad more advanced these heinous TSRs wouldn’t be necessary. But, networking on windows is ridiculous, hence Bonjour. Also, if you want full functionality out of a connected peripheral on Windows there’s usually a secondary program. My mouse uses the Logitech Control Center. Without it, the mouse no work-y too well. Same goes for an iPod.

    But, hey, guess what? If you hook up an Xbox Controller to Windows you don’t even notice anything cause support is baked in. But, if you do the same thing on OS X you have to jump a hoop or two.

    Maybe I should write a couple dozen screeds against the inanity of Microsoft because Apple didn’t bake in support for the Xbox controller?

    Seriously, Joen, how much RAM do you have that this has been a constant source of agitation for you for… what? 5 years now?

    Hugs and Bubble gum,

    -C

    1. Joen says:

      I guess this is about what I want from iTunes, and what I clearly can’t have. That’s all the self-insight you’ll get from this comment, though, as I do find usability issues with the process.

      It all boils down to what the installer SAYS it installs, versus what it DOES install.

      I understand the Bonjour service, but since I don’t ever use it, I don’t want it. It should be an option in the installer, which when unchecked doesn’t install.

      AppleMobileDeviceService should be self-explanatory, that’s for catching iOS devices. iPodService is, one can assume, similar. iTunesHelper is, I believe, for catching things like iTunes Store links.

      It almost makes sense when you say it, but the way it could work, and does for other devices, is that none of these run in the background even when the app is closed.

      If I connect my iPod, iTunes starts, and presumably everything iPodService or AppleMobileDeviceService does could be done from iTunes.

      iTunesHelper… that’s just messed up. As in RealPlayer messed up.

      Perhaps if your operating system of preference were a tad more advanced these heinous TSRs wouldn’t be necessary. But, networking on windows is ridiculous, hence Bonjour. Also, if you want full functionality out of a connected peripheral on Windows there’s usually a secondary program. My mouse uses the Logitech Control Center. Without it, the mouse no work-y too well. Same goes for an iPod.

      Sure, that’s all fine. I’m sure Bonjour is awesome.

      But I don’t want it, so I feel I should be able to install iTunes either without Bonjour, or at least withit disabled.

      So don’t buy Apple, you say? Sure, I’m buying Android all i can, and iTunes is one of the reasons I’m off the Apple ecosystem. But being interested in usability design, I can’t help but feel that installing a permanent TSR without informing the user is a bad thing.

      But, hey, guess what? If you hook up an Xbox Controller to Windows you don’t even notice anything cause support is baked in. But, if you do the same thing on OS X you have to jump a hoop or two.

      Another example would be those magic new USB devices — they come with their own drivers, and install themselves once you plug them in. It’s almost magical.

      Seriously, Joen, how much RAM do you have that this has been a constant source of agitation for you for… what? 5 years now?

      Oh come now, I’m not the only one bugged by this, and I honestly don’t lose any sleep over it since I’ve long since moved to Android and other devices. But, and this is central to this very blog, just because something is good, doesn’t mean it can’t be better! And I think iTunes would be better if it allowed me to choose which parts to install.

      Also, don’t you think it’s kind of a lie that iTunes installes the Apple Updater, even though I specifically told it not to?

  2. Chris says:

    Ya got me on the Apple Updater. But that’s all.

    Bonjour is expected by iTunes to be there. Again, if Windows did networking like *nix OSs do then it wouldn’t be needed.

    And, I’m not saying you’re losing sleep over it but this isn’t the first time nor I expect the last that you’ll bemoan iTunes on Windows. What I’m trying to understand is why you let it take up any of your time. I can’t fully extract Explorer from Windows but I don’t worry about it either.

    As for magical USB devices, they aren’t all that magical. My mouse is only partly functional until I install extra software.

    You don’t want Bonjour installed. Ok, why? Is it using up your system resources to some massive extent? And don’t say, “I just don’t want it.” That’s a lame answer. I want concrete reasons for how it has impeded your life.

    Say you buy a car but it comes with power steering. But, you’re a tough guy. You don’t want power steering. Tough. It’s part of the car. So is Bonjour part of iTunes.

    The iTunesHelper process does little things to make using iTunes a simpler affair. It’s a tiny program that catches requests for iTunes. But, wait, why not just roll it into iTunes? Because, iTunes isn’t always running on some people’s systems. So, make a tiny program so that when someone clicks an iTunes link the full program will be launched.

    If it wasn’t there people would say, this is stupid, why don’t they make a tiny program to catch these things?

    So, please, a bullet pointed list of all the ways the installed programs ruin your computer experience enough to warrant your continued agony at the whole notion of installing iTunes, a program you only install to use products you don’t like (iPad).

    And, again, Rukiye is a saint for being able to put up with your neuroses.

    1. Joen says:

      You don’t want Bonjour installed. Ok, why? Is it using up your system resources to some massive extent? And don’t say, “I just don’t want it.” That’s a lame answer. I want concrete reasons for how it has impeded your life.

      I’m on Windows, I can’t give you concrete answers. But I’ll give you one there’s a chance you’ll accept, and certainly one I don’t consider lame.

      Windows has a halflife. It slowly, little by little, dies. After a certain amount of time has passed and apps have been installed, you get to reinstall. Because that’s pretty much the only way to get snappyness back.

      What makes it this way? I don’t know. I know it’s better in Windows 7, but still not perfect. So every Windows user vets apps using the gut. We’re not sure why our system are suddenly slower. But it might be that app we recently installed, or that TSR that runs a top a stack of other rogue apps in the background.

      So the reason I don’t want Bonjour installed, is that while I have no idea if it, specifically, makes my system slower and more unreliable, I know that I don’t need those networking services, and on Windows, all apps are guilty until proven innocent.

      See, iTunes is not the only bad guy, there are several on Windows. But iTunes _is_ a bad guy on Windows.

      The iTunesHelper process does little things to make using iTunes a simpler affair. It’s a tiny program that catches requests for iTunes. But, wait, why not just roll it into iTunes? Because, iTunes isn’t always running on some people’s systems. So, make a tiny program so that when someone clicks an iTunes link the full program will be launched.

      On Windows there are other ways of doing that, which don’t require TSRs running. Protocol apps — they register themselves to open when you type in, for instance, “ftp://” in the browser… or god forbid type in a bittorrent URL. So I don’t see why it’s needed.

      And, again, Rukiye is a saint for being able to put up with your neuroses.

      Well yeah, she is a saint. But in this case, her trick is to not read my blog, which is anyones prerogative 🙂

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