Sincerity Theory

When you’re hungry and doing what you love, you do good work. When people notice that work, you become successful. Success makes you a different person. Maybe you’re lazy, and can’t compel yourself to do the work. Maybe you’re burned out, or tired of it. Maybe you only ever had one good thing in you.

Success is a temptress and you want desperately to stay in her good graces. You start thinking of what it is people want from you so you can give it to them. Trouble is, you’ve stopped being yourself and started merely doing an impression of yourself. You have become insincere.

Apt observation. Strikes a chord with me. I believe I’ve felt this myself as well as seen it in others.

So, yes, doing what you love brings success, and by all means, throw yourself a nice big party, buy yourself a nice car, soak up the adulation of an adoring crowd. Then shut the fuck up and get back to work.

Read the full thing at Motherfucker.

4 thoughts on “Sincerity Theory”

  1. Anders Rask says:

    Personally I think that’s a bit of BS.

    When you’re hungry and doing what you love, you do good work.

    Says who???

    The base premise of this guy’s ramblings it that people do good work when they’re “hungry” and when they’re not they do shitty work. But this is just a completely arbitrary opinion that may fit a few people.

    I have the exact opposite opinion, which I truly believe fits the majority of people. I think that successful people typically become more successful. This becomes blatantly obvious when you consider that any level of success has been preceded by a lower level of success.

    A banal example: Those guys who get all the girls, they do so because they have the confidence, and they got that confidence by being successful. Those who were unsuccessful shied away and dedicated themselves to other purposes. Perhaps a bit more relevant example: Those guys I know who are truly good at web design became so by being told by everyone that they were good and being positively reinforced to continue and to develop their skills.

    A quick glance at this guy’s homepage tells me he compares this to the “product life cycle”. A product life cycle has absolute nothing to do with the level of success that a product may (or may not) be having.

  2. Joen says:

    Says who???

    Good point. I guess that’s not the. However, could one rewrite it to this:

    When you do good work, chances are you?re hungry and doing what you love

    I have the exact opposite opinion, which I truly believe fits the majority of people. I think that successful people typically become more successful. This becomes blatantly obvious when you consider that any level of success has been preceded by a lower level of success.

    Interesting. I’ll have to think a bit more about this one before I respond. Right now I agree with the both of you.

    Perhaps a bit more relevant example: Those guys I know who are truly good at web design became so by being told by everyone that they were good and being positively reinforced to continue and to develop their skills.

    “Positive reinforcement” certainly rings a bell. I studied pedagogy a while back.

    I’ll get back to you.

  3. Joen says:

    Having thought about it, I think there are several ways to succeed, and the tips and warnings given in this article will work for some people.

    Reflecting on it, and y our comments, I can see how it’s also incredibly offensive. Some people will have so low self-esteem that these pointers are completely useless and ridiculous. Incremental success, as you suggest, is a far better alternative.

    How did I not see this before? I still think it’s a good read, though.

  4. ofg says:

    I think the overall point of Motherfucker’s post was not to explain the mechanism of success, but more to not let past success jeopardize any future growth. And I think that is spot on.

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