Movable Type 4: Open Source!

Very recently announced, a version of Movable Type 4.0 will be open source:

The MTOS Project is a community and Six Apart driven project that will produce an open souce (sic) version of the Movable Type Publishing Platform that will form the core of all other Movable Type products.

This is, no doubt, in response to the fierce competition to the far superior WordPress and up-and-coming products such as Habari et. al. I used to run MT on this very blog, so the real question is: too little, too late? My mind immediately jumps to an article entitled Freedom 0 by Mark Pilgrim, which I’m sure caused countless of MT users to switch to WordPress.

That said, I’ve begun to actually miss the static pages that MT generated. For once, I’d like to see the file-server go down, rather than the database-server. WP-Cache just isn’t cutting it. There’s more on both the Open Source aspect and the new features.

11 thoughts on “Movable Type 4: Open Source!”

  1. khaled says:

    Completely with you on this one. Too little too late. Maybe 3 years ago this would have been something welcoming, now it’s not something I can get excited about.

  2. Levi says:

    I gave MT a go, once… lasted all of a few hours. Your entirely right; too little, too late.

  3. Joen says:

    Maybe 3 years ago this would have been something welcoming, now it?s not something I can get excited about.

    Exactly.

    Even so, while I can’t find the MT logo anywhere on, say Grubers site, I still seem to remember him using MT…

    The really huge benefit MT has over WordPress, is the fact that completely static files are written, meaning the database is only used when actually publishing posts. This is contrary to WordPress — even with WP-Cache, where the database is checked far more often.

  4. Levi says:

    I think that MT’s main benefit is also it’s major flaw. There needs to be a more happy medium built into WP.

  5. Matt says:

    But MT isn’t static when dealing with comments or trackbacks, and with the growth of spam lately a major reason many people still switch from MT is because comments overload their servers, and they don’t have anything like HyperDB to deal with DB partitioning or replication.

    I’m curious why wp-cache isn’t working for you, we’ve benchmarked it at hundreds of requests per second, which should be more than enough for any blog.

  6. Joen says:

    I?m curious why wp-cache isn?t working for you, we?ve benchmarked it at hundreds of requests per second, which should be more than enough for any blog.

    Well it’s two things, and one thing I think I got “fixed” yesterday.

    Essentially, my “timeout” used to be set to 3600. I’m going to try and set that to 999999999 — theoretically that should make things really static. Even if it means my sacrificing Brians Latest Comments.

    The other problem: WP Cache doesn’t purge the cache when a comment is posted. I have no idea why this doesn’t work for me. You’ll notice it when you post here: the comment doesn’t appear until after the timeout (which is still 3600 seconds). So, I can’t set the timeout to infinite until this works. Any idea what’s wrong?

  7. My comments don’t appear at all; wonder if this does.

  8. mo says:

    3600 seconds = one hour

    yet there seems to be another problem also..

    weird.

  9. Joen says:

    My comments don?t appear at all; wonder if this does.

    Ouch. Could be Akismet gone banzai? What did you comment on other than this?

  10. mo says:

    my comment was pretty long… it did include a few urls also

    too bad I didn’t save it, so it never reached the moderation basket? – maybe its in the ‘caught spam’..

    thanks for the e-mail reply btw 🙂

  11. Joen says:

    my comment was pretty long… it did include a few urls also

    too bad I didn?t save it, so it never reached the moderation basket? – maybe its in the ?caught spam?..

    Sorry. It was eaten somehow. I’m working on it 🙂 And thanks for your comment time.

Comments are closed.