Maximize Windows!

windows_vista_notmaximized

windows_vista_maximized

So, being an interface designer, interface developments in the operating systems interest me; differences between the operating systems especially. One such difference is the maximize window behaviour.

On Windows, clicking the maximize button expands the current window to fill the entire screen (see above screenshots) and more importantly, locks the window so it’s immobile until un-maximized again.

mac-vs-pc_macbuttons

On the Mac, on the other hand, there’s no real maximize window feature. Instead, clicking the “expand” button (the plus button) either expands the current window to fit the contents of the document, or expands to fill the entire screen (though not locking the window in place), depending on the application. Clicking the expand button again, makes the window jump back to the size it had prior to being expanded.

A feisty discussion made it clear just how much this difference in behaviour can divide the waters. On one side, you have the pro-choice people who like to be able to maximize a window and focus on that window alone. On the other side, you have those who either do not see a use for the maximize feature at all, or simply prefer the inability to be able to maximize citing improved “multi-tasking” as the primary benefit.

Personally I’m a fierce proponent of the maximize window feature. It allows me to hide my cluttered desktop, it allows maximum use of screen real-estate; it essentially allows me to choose when I want to focus on one thing and one thing only. I can still have multiple windows on one screen if I want to, but I have the extra ability to choose to focus on one app when I want to.

The recent beta of Windows Vista makes this maximize feature even more pronounced. The transparent “glass” interface that Windows Vista sports allows one to see through the chrome of individual windows, thus “lightening” the overall weight of windows (what a load of crap). When maximized, however, the transparent glass becomes opaque (as seen in the screenshots above), tinted in the system color of your choice.

While I think a glass interface in Vista is a big mistake, the “letterbox” feel of maximized windows will make the fullscreen difference between MacOSX and Windows even more pronounced. So, which side are you on, and why? To fullscreen, or not to fullscreen?

43 thoughts on “Maximize Windows!”

  1. Chris says:

    Well you know where I am on this. One note, it’s called the “zoom” button.

    It seems kinda silly that one of your arguments in favor of the windows behaviour is that it now makes up for a behaviour you don’t like (transparency). The whole transparent window thing is rather silly too. The only window I’ve ever made transparent on any OS has always been the terminal (black 50% trans).

  2. Joen says:

    Well you know where I am on this. One note, it?s called the ?zoom? button.

    Fair enough.

    It seems kinda silly that one of your arguments in favor of the windows behaviour is that it now makes up for a behaviour you don?t like (transparency). The whole transparent window thing is rather silly too. The only window I?ve ever made transparent on any OS has always been the terminal (black 50% trans).

    Well, first of all I don’t expect to upgrade to Vista at all. Secondly, should I do so, I’d have options to either turn off the transparency entirely, dim it down, or simply choose a classic skin.

    So, my maximize window argument has nothing whatsoever to do with the fact that Vista has transparency. It’s just the opaque maximized window that underlines the difference, s’all.

  3. Chris says:

    You’re not keen on Vista?

  4. Joen says:

    You?re not keen on Vista?

    Not really, from the beta my colleague installed it just feels like Windows XP on steroids.

    I’m more keen on getting Ubuntu to work. It has maximize like any sane OS, did you know?

  5. Chris says:

    I’ve resigned myself to the fact that you shall never understand the true UI way.

  6. I just like the fact that the buttons are on the edge of the maximised window – right up against the edge of the screen.

    The transparency, not so much 😉

  7. Joen says:

    I just like the fact that the buttons are on the edge of the maximised window – right up against the edge of the screen.

    Agreed! It seems, much as I’ve despised the Windows UI in the past, there’s less to despise now. Having followed lurkingly Microsofts Shell Revealed blog, it’s clear they’ve put a lot of weight into Fitts law. Both the start menu, the close button, the Office button, the Office ribbon, all those things make better use of Fitt’s “infinitely tall” screen metaphor. Points in my book.

    P.S. Elaborations on the Office interface to follow later.

    The transparency, not so much 😉

    Agreed.

  8. Gareth says:

    personally, I cant stand that OS X does not have a maximise button. Working on a mac sometimes feels like I drifted onto a shady website where I have to keep moving and closing pop up windows. I need my interface to be uncluttered and focused on the application I am using. Thank god photoshop on the mac has a maximise button.

  9. Chris says:

    Why your entire argument is moot: I don’t care how the windows function so long as I don’t have to deal with the harassment of the user described in this 37 Signals post.

  10. Cyrris says:

    Vista aside (because I really just don’t care about it), I have to say I support at least having an option somewhere for maximising a window. Just with XP, my desktop is never really cluttered – I have no icons there (I use a mix of quicklaunch, start menu and Launchy), and I can minimise things if I feel the need to. Currently I am on a dual screen system, and if I wasn’t able to maximise whatever was on my left screen I’d go nuts. I usually have Firefox or a graphics/coding app there for browsing or working and the right monitor is for email, Skype and IMs. The reason I have two screens is so that i can dedicate one whole monitor to a particular task. Maximising just makes sense for that.

    If I just had a single small monitor (though I dunno how I can ever go back to that now) then maximising isn’t as helpful and I can see why some may think it’s unnecessary… and for widescreen, well, maximising on one of those just seems a bit useless. Only good reason there I can think of is if you’re viewing a bunch of documents or PDFs side by side, but even then stretching the window fits the bill.

  11. Dave Child says:

    Sometimes I like having windows not maximised – just zoomed. Sometimes, I like something to be maximised. OSX should have a button (or at least, provide the option to show a button) for this in addition to zoom. I don’t care that it might not be the “Mac Way” – that’s irrelevant. Always give the users what they want.

    I also won’t be “upgrading” to Vista. No chance. Ubuntu and OSX for me from now, especially since XaraX has gone open source on Linux.

  12. Joen says:

    Currently I am on a dual screen system, and if I wasn?t able to maximise whatever was on my left screen I?d go nuts. I usually have Firefox or a graphics/coding app there for browsing or working and the right monitor is for email, Skype and IMs. The reason I have two screens is so that i can dedicate one whole monitor to a particular task. Maximising just makes sense for that.

    I have the same setup at work, and a single monitor setup at home and I work the same way. I can throw all sorts of small windows — MP3 Player, a file explorer, email app on one screen, and work in maximized Dreamweaver, Flash or Photoshop on the primary screen.

    If I just had a single small monitor (though I dunno how I can ever go back to that now) then maximising isn?t as helpful and I can see why some may think it?s unnecessary…

    I disagree. As mentioned, I have a single screen setup at home. On this setup, it’s more important than ever that I’m able to maximize windows to be able to use all the limited space I have available. Alt+Tab works fine for me. in this case. I even have my own shortcut, Winkey +A for minimize current window. I also have Rightclick / Scroll to cycle through windows. All in all it makes it work, but I wouldn’t want to be without maximize.

    OSX should have a button (or at least, provide the option to show a button) for this in addition to zoom. I don?t care that it might not be the ?Mac Way? – that?s irrelevant. Always give the users what they want.

    Exactly! No-one has to use it if they don’t want to.

    I also won?t be ?upgrading? to Vista. No chance. Ubuntu and OSX for me from now, especially since XaraX has gone open source on Linux.

    I’m really hoping for Ubuntu. There are some things about it that makes me hesitate, mainly hardware support, but I hear this is improved in 6.10.

  13. Cyrris says:

    I disagree. As mentioned, I have a single screen setup at home. On this setup, it?s more important than ever that I?m able to maximize windows to be able to use all the limited space I have available

    No, I think we do agree =P

    What I said was how I can see why some users don’t see the need for it if they like their plus button. Personally, I used a single screen much as you say you do, and for me that means maximising is definitely needed. My point is that peoples preferences with this sort of thing can be largely influenced by their monitor setup, so OSX really should cater for as many of those options as possible.

    I should add, Windows converts are just going to feel limited by the lack of an option they had way back on what was otherwise an inferior OS. That’s not to say I think OSX should include things to specifically cater for the habits of former Windows users, but it’s a very positive side-effect of adding something which would be useful anyway.

  14. I am totally keen on the maximize button, and I think the lack of (at least the option of) one in Mac OS X, together with the insistence of the one button mouse are the two most pathetic cases of “Well, we can’t admit we’re wrong at THIS point” I’ve seen Apple guilty of.

    Jesus christ, apple. It would take you 3 hours to implement at configurable option that would give us proper maximize.

    The second mouse button you can add to the next generation of apple computers with an option for the stodgy apple users that makes both buttons act as the left one.

    For a company that is otherwise quite willing to rethink things and do the smart thing that is good for the user (most of the time), I find it completely ridiculous that they haven’t done these things years ago.

  15. Joen says:

    For a company that is otherwise quite willing to rethink things and do the smart thing that is good for the user (most of the time), I find it completely ridiculous that they haven?t done these things years ago.

    Ah, it’s so refreshing to hear this from someone I know to be a multi-OS man. I was starting to lose it for a second: could they be right? Was it a bad idea?

  16. XIII says:

    Other multi-os man chiming in, after seeing the massive replies on Bonsai.

    I don’t get the whole ‘yes but x is different’. If so it’s, in this case, an annoying kind of different. I’ve got several computers around for the better part of the day whether it be at home or at work, and they’re running windows, linux in one flavour du jour or another with whatever window manager strikes my fancy that day, and OSX and it’s plain silly that the only one not being able to maximize an app is X.

    To me that’s symptomatic for some of the things that tick me off about the whole ‘Mac way’ of doing things, as much as I love other parts of it.

  17. Daniel P says:

    Personally, I can’t stand the thought of losing precious maximize. When I’m coding (which is like.. what i do on computer), it ruins all focus. Being able to close yourself in on the one particular task at hand is absolutely neccessary if I’m gonna be able to sit a full workday with my applications. I’m sure it’s handy to only have the content-based resize functionality if all you’re doing is surfing the web and chatting or what not, but for anything serious I can’t understand how people would put up with it. Then, I don’t know any programmers who use Macs. ( I take that back, I know one.. and he made his own apps for development, which have a maximize button 😉 )

    But atleast linux and windows have maximize, and that’s good enough for me!

    Jesus christ, apple. It would take you 3 hours to implement at configurable option that would give us proper maximize.

    Please never tell anyone how long it would take them to do anything unless you’re very well versed with the way the company at hand works, and the neccessary code changes required (It makes me think you’re one of my customers..). You’d have to move this through the pipeline, and I’m thinking it would die somewhere between marketing and developer priotizing. I doubt they’re losing alot of (if any) sales based on their lack of a maximize window functionality, and until they have significant reason to believe otherwise, there are better tasks to put their developers on.

  18. Joen says:

    To me that?s symptomatic for some of the things that tick me off about the whole ?Mac way? of doing things, as much as I love other parts of it.

    Exactly.

    Honestly, since Mac started running on the PC platform, I’ve genuinely considered a future switch, if nothing else then to get away from Windows which I have a meh/hate relationship with. But there are just some things about the mac that I can’t possibly live with, knowing how things can be.

    When I?m coding (which is like.. what i do on computer), it ruins all focus. Being able to close yourself in on the one particular task at hand is absolutely neccessary if I?m gonna be able to sit a full workday with my applications.

    Exactly! There are enough distractions already as is. Plus, as I mentioned, somewhere, I have a dual monitor setup. So I can have the cake and eat it too, having it being maximize one app, and eating it being the ability to have lots of stray windows on the left screen.

  19. Rob Mientjes says:

    Oh, yes, now OS-agnostic people are saying that one thing is better than the other, it must be the truth.

    I use the zoom functionality very often when I need it, but wonder how Apple would implement a full-screen environment, seeing as we have the Dock on one of the sides of our screens (I have it on the right side of my right display). Extending below it will render part of the screen useless. Not doing that will still garner enough criticism from the OS-agnostic super experts.

  20. Joen says:

    Oh, yes, now OS-agnostic people are saying that one thing is better than the other, it must be the truth.

    Not necessarily.

    I realize I’m not one to be saying this since I’m firmly lodged in the pro-fullscreen camp, but neither OSX, Windows XP/Vista or Ubuntu / Gnome / KDE are perfect interfaces. We should be looking to the future with regards to how to handle applications on operating systems. In my experience with Mac, the Mac UI designers are actually pretty good at this, daring to try new things. But in the case of having one application (one computer tool, so to speak) be fullscreen, I objectively can’t see why this feature shouldn’t be embraced.

    As for how technically to go about creating a fullscreen feature for OSX, I’m sure the Apple engineers could think of something. In fact, I think great advantage could be taken by spending some time making sure the future Mac maximize feature really blows away all other OS Maximize features. I could imagine using a UNO style interface for the top file menu / top of application. I can imagine creating a solid background behind the floating palettes of photoshop, or just dim the background that’s there, say 50% black. I can imagine suspending the use of the dock until you invoke Expos?, or something. I really think fullscreen on Mac could not only work, but work really well.

  21. Joen says:

    In a related note, I’m told that if you hold down the alt key (option key) and click on the green plus, it maximizes the window instead of its usual behaviour. Any mac users care to try / explain how this works / how well this works?

  22. Rob Mientjes says:

    I really think fullscreen on Mac could not only work, but work really well.

    I guess it’s too late to ask from Apple to make something revolutionary in regards to that right into Leopard at this point. I think it’ll have to be quite a shift from other window managers, just the things you mention alone. If Apple will innovate on this topic, I’m sure many Linux desktop environments will take it over, and Microsoft will still have the “old way”. I’m afraid Apple won’t do it, though, or not soon.

    We don’t know Leopard, but then again, what do we know.

    Not necessarily.

    Well, you know why I say it though.

  23. Chris says:

    Regarding the option-click I believe the point of that is to jump from one state to the other. Kinda hard to explain now that I think of it. You set the window to a certain size, say full-width–height (to differentiate from full screen as you imagine it with locked windows) and then use the zoom blob normally to contract the window to the document’s dimensions, then option-clicking the blob will return to the previous window state. Basically, set your window size to full and then contract and from then on option clicking will result in a full screen (sans your locked windows).

    Does that make sense? It’s much easier to just show you and grunt and point.

    This brings up another little difference I feel like pointing out to be cantankerous. The three main keys on a PC:

    1. ctrl
    2. alt
    3. win-key

    On a Mac:

    1. control
    2. option
    3. apple key (command)

    Why is it Apple can fit the full words on the keys but PCs can’t? That’s true for all the keys. Macs don’t have ‘del’ keys. They have ‘delete’ keys. As regards the apple (command) key not actually writing out “command” I think that’s a matter of flair and is actually simpler to support. “Hit which key?” The one with the apple on it.” So, I’ll give the win-key a pass except where keyboard shortcuts require the use of the win-key.

    On a Mac, you look at a menu, if there is a corresponding command-key shortcut the logo for the command key and the letter are displayed. Does windows ever display the win-key logo in menu items? I ask cause it’s been some time since I used windows and I don’t recall it being there.

    Incidentally, there’s a nice writeup on the Apple command key and Windows Logo Key. If you ask me, the command key makes more sense as does the relationships of the control, option and command keys to one another as opposed to the seemingly haphazard nature of the window s environment.

    So, there you go, something else to bitch about. Welcome. 🙂

  24. Joen says:

    Does that make sense? It?s much easier to just show you and grunt and point.

    Not enough sense that it’d be useful to me in any way, unfortunately.

    Why is it Apple can fit the full words on the keys but PCs can?t? That?s true for all the keys. Macs don?t have ?del? keys. They have ?delete? keys. As regards the apple (command) key not actually writing out ?command? I think that?s a matter of flair and is actually simpler to support. ?Hit which key?? The one with the apple on it.? So, I?ll give the win-key a pass except where keyboard shortcuts require the use of the win-key.

    PCs can. I’m almost certain it depends on the keyboard design. My Logitech clearly says “Delete”, “Insert”, “Home”, “Page Up”, etc. The only abbreviation is Print Screen, which says “Prt Scr” and “Sys Rq”, for some reason. Remember, Mac makes both hardware and OS, while on PC we have a multitude of choices.

    On a Mac, you look at a menu, if there is a corresponding command-key shortcut the logo for the command key and the letter are displayed. Does windows ever display the win-key logo in menu items? I ask cause it?s been some time since I used windows and I don?t recall it being there.

    AFAIK the Win key is never used for menu item shortcuts. It serves quite few purposes, really… Of course the Win key invokes the start menu. Win + F is find, Win + R is run, Win + E is explorer (finder). Win + D is desktop. In Vista, Win + Tab is fancy alt-tab, a.k.a. “Flip3D”. I use an app that lets me assign further shortcuts to the win key. So for me, Win + N is sticky note. Win + A is minimize current window.

    Generally, only Alt is used for menus on Windows. Combine that with underlined first letters, such as “File”, and it means you hit Alt + F to open the file menu. This isn’t really optimal, but Microsoft is trying to rectify this in Office 2007, where holding down Alt will show small tooltips over each button that has a key shortcut. I think that seems to work reasonably well.

  25. First, I think Chris’ comments about “why does it say del and not delete?” are nitpicking in the extreme (no offense Chris) and if I was to venture a guess why it was the case (when it is, which it isn’t on my PC keyboard), it has to do with tradition. Back when everything in computers was abbreviated.

    I mean, just look at the unix command line, and rm or mv a file.

    Second, I find that Apples approach to the keyboard is in fact better in some ways.

    I like that the apple key is a dedicated shortcut key, and that it’s placed next to the space bar, which is far less awkward for your hand than the placement of the ctrl key.

    Second, Apple left the alt key for what it’s for, whereas Windows has ruined the use of the alt-key by using it for menu navigation.

    That means I can’t write alt-o for ? in windows, and stuff like that.

    But then I find Apples hardware keyboards (except their laptop keyboards) to have an exceptionally shitty feel, exchanging good, pleasant use for a nice clean look.

    Furthermore, to play Chris’ game, they seem to have symbols (!) instead of words like “page up”, “page down” and “home” and “end”.

    Finally (for the laptop keybs), I hate that they optimized the delete-to-the-right-of-the-cursor key away and make you use the fn-key.

    Overall winner in my book is to put an ugly but super nice keyboard like a keytronic in a mac and thus get the proper alt keys and smarter keyboard shortcuts, while not having to suffer the not-so-concave designer keys of the apple keyboard.

  26. Joen says:

    Back when everything in computers was abbreviated.

    I mean, just look at the unix command line, and rm or mv a file.

    ZING!

    That means I can?t write alt-o for ? in windows, and stuff like that.

    Interesting. I have gotten used to the Windows way in this case, but I see your way / the original intention is better.

  27. Mark Jaquith says:

    As a Windows-to-Ubuntu and then Ubuntu-to-OSX convert, I find the “zoom” button very confusing. Its behavior is not standardized. It does one thing in one app, and something else entirely in another app. I can’t predict its behavior, so I don’t use it.

    As for true maximize behavior, I’d rarely use it. It’s all about multi-tasking for me. The only situation where I’d really want something to be maximized is if I’m showing something to someone else. Maximizing makes for a poor work flow, but when you want to showcase something exclusively, it makes sense.

    Alt-Cmd-H (“Hide others”) works decently, although it’s unconscionable to me that there is no shortcut for the “Show all” functionality.

    Resizing and moving is also a pain in OS X. I use Mondo Mouse to get around that (allows modifier-key + drag for resize and moving operations).

  28. Daniel P says:

    As a side note, the transparency of windows in Vista is disableable. I have the windows 99% opaque.. So you can just barely hint that there’s something behind them, but transparent windows still shine through a decent amount.

    It’s actually a much more pleasant OS than I’d expected. It’s stolen a bit of the OS X feel, but removed most of the things I don’t like about it. 🙂

    So far, I’m pleased.

  29. Steve Jobs says:

    I hate the maximize behavior on the mac. It is very annoying that you have to deal with a cluttered window. Another annoying feature was the lack of functionality on the “home” and “end” keys. But luckily I found a fix for that thanks to Chris:

    http://www.gigoblog.com/2006/11/27/new-to-macintosh-but-like-windows-xp-keyboard-behavior/

    Another major hate factor on the mac is the MS Office UI. WTF is all that shit floating all over the place. Can you please provide me with a coherent single window to work with – with the option to move shit around if I need to? All that clutter is so annoying…quite unimpressive when compared to the clutter free hardware and OS Apple develops.

  30. Dagibit says:

    What really makes me twitch is if you’ll notice, the symbol for the minimize button isn’t centered in its space. Yea, I know its like the freaking stupidest thing to care about, but, like, Its not freaking balanced like everything else up there! I mean, like… come on!

    Also the window buttons on the maximized image shouldn’t Have that stupid border.

    Ok, so I’m insane. But here’s something that isn’t.

    I’m more afraid of accidentally pressing the close button, rather than the minimize/maximize buttons. So why was the close button made even bigger? Perhapse it would have been better (even if possibly less attractive) to expand the other buttons to which accidental clicking doesn’t matter?

  31. Dagibit – check this out: http://bytebounce.com/file/343/65e0b/centered.png

    Perfectly centered. Totally a reason to buy a mac 🙂

  32. Joen says:

    Maybe Dagabit was referring to the Windows minimize symbol, which is kinda off. I guess, a reason to buy a mac 🙂

    Not for me, though.

  33. I understood what he meant and made a joke: “Look, on mac the button is centered properly – go buy a mac” – the worst reason in the world to buy a mac 🙂

  34. Joen says:

    I understood what he meant and made a joke: ?Look, on mac the button is centered properly – go buy a mac? – the worst reason in the world to buy a mac 🙂

    Oh, fair enough. 🙂

    I kinda like the new button look. Fortunately, if you maximize a window, the close button hit area actually does extend all the way to the corner, so I find it usable too.

  35. Stan says:

    There are 2 types of users.

    Those who love maximized windows and those who hate it.

    There are 2 leading operating systems. One that allows all both users who love and hate maximized windows to use it while the other (mac os) doesn’t allow those who like maximized windows to use it.

    So why don’t more people buy macs? Let’s see – maybe it’s because they aren’t giving everyone the features windows offers (or any operating system 15 years old or less has offered).

  36. Chris says:

    So why don?t more people buy macs? Let?s see – maybe it?s because they aren?t giving everyone the features windows offers (or any operating system 15 years old or less has offered).

    That’s the most retarded argument I’ve heard yet. By which, I mean your thinking is retarded.

    I… Ugh. I don’t even know how to hold a conversation with you.

    @Joen

    What the heck is going on today?

  37. Tristan says:

    Yeah, why did this come back up from months ago? Weird.

    In any case, maximizing makes great sense because it gives the application the use of the corners of the screen, which are by far the largest hit areas available in the entire operating system (approximately equivalent to half the screen area from the user’s perspecitve). I think this is called Fitt’s law? I can’t remember.

    It makes “Close” extremely easy to do, but not terribly easy to get wrong since it’s still up in the corner. Really great UI if you ask me.

    Thus, I am in the “Maximize” camp, but really it works both ways, one just is less annoying.

  38. Joen says:

    What the heck is going on today?

    Golden oldies? Diamonds are forever? Good posts never die?

    In any case, I’m enjoying it. And while you don’t agree with Stan, I think I understand him and agree just a little bit!

    In any case, maximizing makes great sense because it gives the application the use of the corners of the screen, which are by far the largest hit areas available in the entire operating system (approximately equivalent to half the screen area from the user?s perspecitve). I think this is called Fitt?s law? I can?t remember.

    Right on the money. I think it’s about “inifinitely tall screens, meaning, even if you drag your mouse 50 meters across the corner, you’ll still end up in the corner.

    It makes ?Close? extremely easy to do, but not terribly easy to get wrong since it?s still up in the corner. Really great UI if you ask me.

    In all fairness, OSX uses the screen edges too, as in one for the menu and one for the dock. Additionally, I’m pretty sure you can assign Expos? and possibly various other things to each of the corners.

    I do, like you, prefer the Windows way to go, which means, one screen edge for the top of a maximized window, one corner for close and one corner for “start button”.

    Interestingly, Ubuntu has a nice take on this. I’m not sure if I prefer it, but in Ubuntu, you have a taskbar in the bottom edge, the launcher in the top edge, the recycle bin in the bottom right corner, “show desktop” in the bottom left corner, “start program” in the top left corner, and I forget what it has in the top right corner.

  39. lewis says:

    SHUT THE HELL UP! IF YOU DONT LIKE MAXIMIZED WINDOWS AND U LIKE MAC GET A MAC AND DONT COMPLAIN ABOUT MAXIMIZING.

    IF YOU LIKE DOING BOTH AND A BETTER EXPERNCE IN THE LOOKS DEPARTMENT GET A WINDOWS

    IF YOU WANT BOTH GET A MAC AND THEN BOOT CAMP AND PUT VISTA ON IT BUT JUST DONT COMPLAIN

    AND DONT REPLY WITH SOME CLEVER COMMENT JUST LEAVE IT AT THAT

    and if you must know i like maximised and the look and layout of windows but prefer everthing else about mac so i put them together and wala the best os ever

  40. Joen says:

    AND DONT REPLY WITH SOME CLEVER COMMENT JUST LEAVE IT AT THAT

    Since when did honest, kind and informed discussion / criticism ever become a bad thing?

    If something can be improved, shouldn’t it?

  41. Lewis, buddy – try pressing that funny looking key to the left of the “A” until it doesn’t have a light in it.

    If it’s on, It sets your keyboard to a mode where you come off as a complete retard every time you post something.

  42. Stoo says:

    Mac OS is not ADHD friendly.

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