Partitioning for Ubuntu

A good friend of mine unknowingly convinced me to try out Ubuntu Linux. Armed with version 6.06 I tried the bootable install disc. Impressively, this disc booted directly into the OS, a live version running directly off the CD. Setup would be as simple as clicking the “install” shortcut on the desktop.

Yet it’s never that simple, is it? I need a partition to install Ubuntu on. I have space for such a partition, but I haven’t enough space to wipe the entire drive and format/partition. As such, I’m in need of reliable partitioning software that’ll rescale current partitions and create a new one for Ubuntu.

Does anyone have advice for rescaling partitions? Software (preferrably free) recommendations? Ubuntu specific install tips?

9 thoughts on “Partitioning for Ubuntu”

  1. khaled says:

    No ideas dude, but once you’ve got this problem sorted (which I’m pretty sure is only a small matter) then definitely hit me with all the little problems/questions you have, having installed the 64bit version I know what works and what doesn’t…generally speaking.

    All I’m going to say is that once you’ve experienced some of the things (that just make sense), you’ll be reuing every time you have to go back to the windows environment…seriously it’s like experiencing Firefox in many respects and then being told that you’ve got to use IE 6 for some basic things…but the good news it’s getting better and only looks to get better in the not too distant future. Development is coming thick and fast from all areas.

  2. Joen says:

    No ideas dude, but once you?ve got this problem sorted (which I?m pretty sure is only a small matter) then definitely hit me with all the little problems/questions you have, having installed the 64bit version I know what works and what doesn?t…generally speaking.

    Thanks. I’ll be installing the 32 bit version myself, even though I have a 64 bit processor. As long as my favourite apps aren’t 64-bit (or l linux, even), I don’t think it’ll make a difference in my daily routine.

    All I?m going to say is that once you?ve experienced some of the things (that just make sense), you?ll be reuing every time you have to go back to the windows environment…seriously it?s like experiencing Firefox in many respects and then being told that you?ve got to use IE 6 for some basic things…but the good news it?s getting better and only looks to get better in the not too distant future. Development is coming thick and fast from all areas.

    I imagine so too, that’s why I want to try this. I also want to know how fast and well WINE runs.

  3. khaled says:

    Certain things run really well with WINE and Google has given a lot of code to WINE due to it trying to put picasa for linux, although google earth is completely native to linux..but apparetnly their contribution is making it easier for people to implement things…once again good news for nix users.

  4. a random netsurfer says:

    Use the gparted livecd (more safe to use than ubuntu’s install partition software, as it is slightly more recent):

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php

  5. John Evans says:

    I have done an install of Ubuntu recently, and the installer has a really good graphical partitioner that will resize your current partitions just fine. At least it did a great job with the install I did. Also you can run the partitioner from the Live CD it should be in one of the system config menus.

  6. Joen says:

    a random netsurfer said:

    Use the gparted livecd (more safe to use than ubuntu?s install partition software, as it is slightly more recent):

    http://gparted.sourceforge.net/livecd.php

    Thanks for the comment, random netsurfer :). However, gparted looks to be a linux program (that you have to build yourself, even — is this what I should get used to?), and I’m using the LiveCD to try and install.

    John Evans said:

    I have done an install of Ubuntu recently, and the installer has a really good graphical partitioner that will resize your current partitions just fine. At least it did a great job with the install I did. Also you can run the partitioner from the Live CD it should be in one of the system config menus.

    Thanks for the note. I was shown that installer as well, but I think I chickened out as I hadn’t made a backup of things just yet. Plus, while I’m no stranger to partitioning drives… I seem to remember something being wrong. Do you know of a tutorial for resizing using the built-in partitioner?

  7. John Evans says:

    Well there are tutorials on using Gparted but the installer will do the leg work for you.

    Look here (about half way down there is a section on the partitioning)

    Notice all you need to do is use the scrub bar to select how big you want to make the new partition for Linux and the Ubuntu installer does the rest.

    If you want to be more geeky then just ask google, I cant reccomend a particular tutorial as I have not used any, I like to dive right in 😉

  8. Joen says:

    Thanks for all your help.

    I actually managed to install Ubuntu now. The built-in LiveCD partitioner, in my opinion, wasn’t as nice as I wanted it to be. I could have used more detailed descriptions of what was happening — to me (and I’m no newbie), it was all still pretty techy. Additionally, something actually went wrong with the rescaling of the partition. The partition was correctly scaled, but a reboot had Windows “repair” somethings using chkdsk.

    Now in Ubuntu, I’m enjoying somethings, and annoyed at others. I’ll probably write a bit more about it down the road, but some of the cool things:

    • Most of the things you expect to be difficult are easy
    • The default configuration is surprisingly commercial and nice

    Some bad things:

    • The things that are easy on Windows (installing stuff, installing drivers, configuring login screens, so on) are surprisingly difficult.
    • Verdana and Arial on Ubuntu just doesn’t look like they do on Windows.
  9. khaled says:

    I found a great little tutorial that sorts out fonts, which used to be a major issue on Linux, now fonts look better on my linux box than on windows. As for the installation of drivers etc, yeah it’s a bit of a struggle at first to get everything up and running but that’s just teething pains that you go through, with the rewards being oh so much greater :). I’ve got a huge post on that coming up, it’s just taking me a couple of weeks to sort it all out to be honest with you.

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