Chernobyl: Nuclear Guardian

It seems animal wildlife prefers radiation over humans:

The exclusion zone around the Chernobyl nuclear power station is teeming with life.

As humans were evacuated from the area 20 years ago, animals moved in. Existing populations multiplied and species not seen for decades, such as the lynx and eagle owl, began to return.

British scientist and environmentalist James Lovelock goes on to say:

“I have wondered if the small volumes of nuclear waste from power production should be stored in tropical forests and other habitats in need of a reliable guardian against their destruction by greedy developers”.
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4 thoughts on “Chernobyl: Nuclear Guardian”

  1. Jonas Rabbe says:

    If we were to store nuclear waste in natural habitats one can only speculate on the detrimental effects on the species. Maybe old species will return and the forrest will flourish, but if half the offspring dies due to birth defects is that, or if the species develop chronic diseases, is that something we are willing to trade off, on their behalf?

    I’ve never liked nuclear waste, and it’ll take some convincing before I’ll agree this could be a good idea.

  2. Joen says:

    Jonas Rabbe said:

    If we were to store nuclear waste in natural habitats one can only speculate on the detrimental effects on the species. Maybe old species will return and the forrest will flourish, but if half the offspring dies due to birth defects is that, or if the species develop chronic diseases, is that something we are willing to trade off, on their behalf?

    I?ve never liked nuclear waste, and it?ll take some convincing before I?ll agree this could be a good idea.

    What’s interesting here is that I completely agree with you. That’s why it’s interesting to see how, apparently, nature seems to flourish in the Chernobyl area more-so than it would do if humans lived there, or just came by there from time to time (i.e. it wasn’t an extremely guarded 30 km radius area totally off limits to any sane humans).

    I’m not saying I think it’s a good idea to dump nuclear waste in the rainforest. Rather, I’m taking this as a wake-up call: if things are so bad between humans and nature that wildlife prefers radiation over humans, then we’ve got a problem.

  3. Jonas Rabbe says:

    Joen said:

    Rather, I?m taking this as a wake-up call: if things are so bad between humans and nature that wildlife prefers radiation over humans, then we?ve got a problem.

    If I had your eloquence that was what I would have said.

  4. Joen says:

    Jonas Rabbe said:

    Joen said:

    Rather, I?m taking this as a wake-up call: if things are so bad between humans and nature that wildlife prefers radiation over humans, then we?ve got a problem.

    If I had your eloquence that was what I would have said.

    I find you eloquent enough, and I’m sure what I said was actually implied in what you said… i’m just putting it out there 🙂

    Plus, i LOVE the word “Nuclear Guardian”, for all the wrong reasons of course.

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