Bloodtype B-Positive

I gave blood at my local bloodbank yesterday. It was a tiny prickle that yielded half a litre of blood. It turns out I’m B-positive, which is 8% of the population. As I looked at the sheet of percentages it hit me that people shouldn’t stay away from the blood-bank thinking that their bloodtype is common and therefore unnecessary: it just means the same percentage will need that particular bloodtype.

Have you ever given blood? Why? Why not?

15 thoughts on “Bloodtype B-Positive”

  1. I’m A positive.

    My dad’s been a blood donor for as long as I can remember, and I know it sounds weird, but it’s something I’ve always wanted to do.

    While in primary school, I did some research and found out that the age to donate is 16 years. You must also be at least 51 Kg.

    Now I’m a petite, short short short Asian girl, and admittedly am under 51 Kg, but I just drink lots and lots of water before hand so that I’m exactly 51 or 52 Kg.

    I made it my goal to donate blood on my 16th birthday – which I did accomplished last year. The way I see it – it only takes me 5-10 minutes, I feel nothing, it’s not like I have a morbid fear of needles, it costs me nothing (hey you even get tea/coffee/juice and biscuits afterwards), and I could be saving a life.

    One day I, or someone close to me, may need blood, and it will be another donor out there who will be saving my or my loved one’s life.

  2. Joen says:

    See if more people shared your spirit, this would be a better world I’m sure. Needless to say I agree with all your comments for the same reasons as you. Thanks for your comment.

  3. Levi says:

    O positive here I beleive. The most versitile of the blood types if I’m not mistaken. I plan to go down and donate soon, it’s my girlfriend’s idea — and a good one at that.

    Good entry Joen, it’s a neglected topic these days.

  4. Joen says:

    O positive here I beleive. The most versitile of the blood types if I?m not mistaken. I plan to go down and donate soon, it?s my girlfriend?s idea — and a good one at that.

    A good one indeed… that’s valuable blood you’re walking around with there! Share the wealth 😉

    Good entry Joen, it?s a neglected topic these days.

    Thanks. Yeah it’s the little things that make a huge difference.

  5. I give blood all the time, since I am a type O- and am a rare (<8% of US population). We have donation-mobiles all the time on campus at my university.

  6. Joen says:

    I give blood all the time, since I am a type O- and am a rare (

  7. Nicole says:

    I’m fairly certain that I’m A positive, and I’ve wanted to give blood for several years, but, unfortunately, the Red Cross won’t accept my blood because I lived for too long in Europe. Also, until recently, I believe, I was also unacceptable because I’d been in a malaria-infested area within X number of years. 🙁

  8. Joen says:

    Nicole,

    I donn’t know how it works where you live (the states?) but isn’t there some rule that says if you haven’t been to europe for the last 6 months or so, it’s okay again?

    I’ll be going to Malaysia for 2 weeks soon, and that means a 6 month quarantine for me.

  9. Nicole says:

    I donn?t know how it works where you live (the states?) but isn?t there some rule that says if you haven?t been to europe for the last 6 months or so, it?s okay again?

    I do live in the States, actually. Checking over the guidelines on the American Red Cross site, it looks like I have reached eligibility status because it’s been more than 3 years since I went to Tanzania and I only lived in Germany for two-and-a-half years rather than five or more. Must keep an eye out for the next blood drive on campus, then!

  10. Joen says:

    3 years since I went to Tanzania and I only lived in Germany for two-and-a-half years rather than five or more

    3 years! Wow, that’s some quarantine. But I’m thrilled you checked up on it, and on behalf of some person in need, thanks 🙂

  11. Bilal says:

    I haven’t yet, as I’m still under 18. :

  12. greymullet says:

    people shouldn?t stay away from the blood-bank thinking that their bloodtype is common and therefore unnecessary: it just means the same percentage will need that particular bloodtype.

    Doesn’t quite work like that Joen. Anyone can receive type O blood, regardless of their own bloodtype. Type B blood isn’t only useful for Type B patients either, someone with blood of Type AB can accept it too.

  13. Joen says:

    Hmm yeah, that thought did strike me. Even so, having stockpiles of type O blood won’t hurt 🙂

  14. Lisa Balogun says:

    i had thought about being a blood donor before and two days before christmas i found myself in the hospital as a blood recipient needing four units of blood. i found out that that time i am b positive which only accounts for about 8 percent of the population. become a volunteer and give blood. it does save lives. i am proof of it.

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