Genericons Neue

One Automattic “hack day” many years ago, I released Genericons, a font containing a bunch of little icons useful for blogs and websites. For this years hack day, I created a new version, Genericons Neue. It’s visually more coherent and icons are better weighted against each other. The set comes with minified SVG files ready for use, as well as an icon font if you want to use that (buyer beware). If you’re a fan of Node, there’s a module you can install. It’s super easy to use, and I encourage you to use the set, fork it, customize it, and bundle it with your themes.

genericons-neue

The original Genericons set was created for the WordPress Twenty Thirteen theme. A goal for that theme was to be colorful, and in order for that to work, icons for tags, categories and comments had to be easily re-colored using only CSS, something which PNGs did not allow. SVG support wasn’t impressive at the time, and so Genericons became an icon font. Inspired by The Making of Octicons, Genericons were pixel-perfectly drawn in Glyphs Mini. It was quite an arduous process.

Genericons Neue is focused fully on icons, so all logos have been removed — more on that in a bit. The set now use grunt to build everything from the minified SVGs to the icon font. The build process is like a black box: you feed it a folder of SVG icons you drew, and it outputs formats ready to be used in your themes and web projects.

If you’re coming from Genericons, do note that there are no logos in Genericons Neue. Because Genericons was so early to the icon-font game, it more or less became a kitchen-sink for icons and logos. First just a few logos — “the most important ones” — then slowly it grew into too many. There were a bunch of little dingbats and one-offs, like triangles for CSS speech-bubbles today better done using just CSS alone. It was useful at the time, but it diluted the focus on being a great and consistent set of icons. On top of that, logos present unique challenges. Aside from having to be kept up-to-date with rebrandings, how should they be sized? Every logo is drawn on a unique grid, they don’t all fit well on a tiny pixel-perfect grid.

If you would like to upgrade from Genericons to Genericons Neue, you can use logos from a different set, such as Social Logos. If you are only using the icons also present in Neue, it’s a drop-in replacement as the icon font will map to the same codepoints.

I hope that you’ll like Genericons Neue!

Cardboard Coffee

One thing that’s always boggled me is the increasing fascination with drinking coffee out of cardboard cups. Part of my fascination stems from the fact that it seems like a huge waste of resources — you could be making virtual reality goggles from that cardboard! But most of my curiosity has to do with the indisputable fact that coffee tastes worse out of cardboard.

I consider that truth to be self-evident. The delicious nectar that is coffee deserves better than to be carried in laminated paper and guzzled through a tiny hole in a plastic lid.

I get it, I get it, you can take a cardboard mug with you on your commute, or as you’re walking down the street, or as you’re waiting in line, and coffee through a plastic lid is better than no coffee at all.

It’s true.

But I’ve seen things you people wouldn’t believe. I’ve seen people in non-commute non-transit situations pick cardboard over glorious porcelain — intentionally and of their own volition and not while under duress (I checked to make sure).

Usually I can even all I need to. But when it comes to coffee, and porcelain is an option, and you still choose cardboard… I’m all out of evens. At that point, I can’t even.

One time I stopped a good friend as he was doing it, and like a concerned parent I asked him why he would pick the cardboard over the porcelain when both options were right there in front of him, in plain sight, literally on the table. He answered:

I like the idea that if I need to go somewhere, I can take the coffee with me.

Okay, that’s actually a fair point.

I mean, I’d just gulp down the coffee from the porcelain and then go ahead and grab another one in cardboard to bring along, but sure, the above is a cogent argument.

Still, I can’t help but feel like cardboard coffee is becoming a status symbol outside of just mobility: “Look at me, I’m on the move!” And that makes me sad. It makes me even sadder than it does when people add sugar to their coffee.

What is wrong with you people‽


This was originally posted elsewhere.

Mocco

This blog just switched names1. It used to be called “Noscope”, which was a name I came up with in 2001. Back then, I thought it as a fun play on the fact that this site was intended to be nothing more than a vent — an outlet I could use to create anything without purpose or scope. Since then the term “noscope” has come to mean something else entirely.

This is now “Mocco”, which is a nonsense word that’s closeish to a coffee ingredient I like. It’s also short, and it was sitting unused in my domain wallet. Welcome, again.


  1. I switched server too, Digital Ocean + Serverpilot is amazing!  

⌘ + Tab from Photoshop to Chrome

In the latest Creative Cloud release of Photoshop, switching from Photoshop to Chrome with Command + Tab doesn’t work. As a favor for people googling this, a workaround is to set Photoshop in “Full Screen Mode”. Tap F twice, or pick View → Screen Mode → Full Screen Mode. Palettes are hidden by default in this screen mode, but you can unhide them by tapping Tab.

Update: Another excellent workaround is to use Sketch.

A Culture of Antagonism

It was a day like any other, and it was an innocently looking article like any other. But on this one day, this one particular article and this one paragraph in particular that just missed my good side entirely:

Jim Carrey brought us our first live-action taste of Count Olaf from A Series of Unfortunate Events, but Netflix’s upcoming TV series adaptation is (thankfully) going in a different direction.

It’s an article from The Verge. It’s nothing out of the ordinary, and I like this publication perfectly fine. I hold no grudges against the author either — this could’ve been published in any fine recent publication. All’s good on that front. I’m also not a particular Jim Carrey fan these days, that doesn’t change a thing. It’s just, this one day, that last sentence got to me.

but Netflix’s upcoming TV series adaptation is (thankfully) going in a different direction

On this day — it’d been snowing, by the way, it was rather pretty outside — this one sentence reminded me of everything I loathe about modern online discourse. I read this sentence — and I invite you to correct me, gosh I hope so much that I’m wrong about this — as an off-hand dismissive critique of the older film Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, starring Jim Carrey, Emily Browning and Liam Aiken. The sentence seems to suggest that this older film is so atrociously bad that the new Netflix series (which I welcome) thankfully goes in a different direction. THANKFULLY! THANKFULLY!!

It’s fun how bright the day can look when snow covers the ground. Yet inside of me, my heart held only darkness.

The 2004 movie is one of my favorite movies of all time. I dare you to watch the following deleted scene, and not at least have a tiny appreciation for the music and the visuals. Gorge on those trees.

 

This scene ends on a simple note: There’s always something. And this film has just that: something. I heartily recommend it to you. Watch it tonight, I’m sure you can stream it.

While I mourn the lack of a sequel, I’m not objecting to a Netflix remake, I welcome it. It’s a wonderful story, I’d love more. What I mourn is that we can’t respect creative work for what it is. Today we apparently have to hate something that wasn’t a runaway box office success and the beginning of an endless franchise.

In fact Lemony Snicket did reasonably at the box office and got a solid 72% at RottenTomatoes. It featured amazing performances by two of my favorite actresses, Meryl Streep and Jennifer Coolidge, not to mention the protagonist kids themselves. The soundtrack is amazing, and the end titles… oh the end titles. Take it in:

There are no levels on which I don’t adore this film. It’s okay if you don’t. 

Lately it just feels like everyone hates everything. Because it’s easier to dismiss something, than to like it. Because if you like something, you put yourself out there. You reveal to the world what makes you happy, what makes you cry, what makes you reflect, cope with, or just enjoy life. Someone might make fun of you for loving something, so it’s easier to hate it. It’s breeds a culture of antagonism, and while it might protect you from occasional ridicule by people not worth your time, it also insulates you from possibly discovering something amazing.

If only we could see past arbitrary notions of what’s cool to like, and judge movies and music and books on their own merits. Because there’s always something.